Nuclear Power
Environmental Issues

The UK Government has come out firmly in favour of nuclear energy as part of the ‘energy mix’ to reduce reliance on foreign imports of gas and assist their climate change strategy of carbon dioxide reduction. But nuclear energy is not clean and green. It is dirty, dangerous and extremely expensive. The nuclear industry has engaged in a campaign of deceit and propaganda to convince the public that nuclear power is needed to end global warming and that they can do it cheaply and safely. But at every stage the nuclear industry is heavily reliant on fossil fuels, CFCs and water. The mining of uranium, a finite resource, is so water intensive that just one mine in S Australia uses 30 million litres a day. At the end of the process we are left with a toxic legacy, currently 500 million tons of radioactive waste tailings and over 10,000 metric tons of highly radioactive spent fuel discharged from nuclear reactors each year. And after 5 decades there is still no solution to the world’s nuclear waste.


Winter 2017

No Need for Nuclear: the Renewables are Here
Did you know that solar panels produced more electricity than Britain’s eight nuclear power stations for the first time May?  And wind & solar together provide for the UK’s entire energy needs on one day in June? As the infrastructure gets more efficient, the UK is better able to take advantage of sunny and windy days.
Government research has consistently shown that renewable are now the most popular of energy amongst the general public, yet the government wrongly claims that they fail to win public support and remains committed to building a new generation of nuclear power plants.

A panel of internationally renowned experts addressed the issues, presenting papers on radiation and radioactivity dangers, comparative analysis of nuclear and renewable costs, UK energy demand and supply and the politics of nuclear power. The scientific information presented in these papers demonstrates the importance in campaigning alongside other groups concerned about the impacts of human activity on the environment, contributing to global warming which is the other existential threat to all life on this planet.

In the East Midlands area there is a direct link to the current campaigns against fracking around the region.

Conference web site: cnduk.org/NoNeedForNuclear

Autumn 2017

Nuclear Industry – post Brexit crisis looms
Britain’s nuclear industry has issued its strongest warning yet on the problems it faces if the government is unable to strike new international atomic power deals during Brexit talks. Failure to put in place alternative arrangements to replace the existing European nuclear treaty, Euratum, which the UK is quitting as part of the Brexit process, would have a ‘dramatic impact’ on Hinkley Point & other new power stations, on existing operations and the waste & decommissioning sectors which all depend on cooperation with other nuclear states.
Our reputation for co-operation is, however, not good. On the 20th March this year a UN committee asked the Government to suspend all work on Hinkley Point because of their failure to consult with other European countries about the transboundary environmental impacts of the project. The body said the government should wait until it has heard back from countries including Germany, Norway and the Netherlands. Hinkley is just one of a fleet of new nuclear power stations that the government hopes will be built over the next 15 years.
But a cloud has been cast over one of the biggest projects, at Moorside in Cumbria, because one of its key backers, Toshiba, has suffered financial problems and promised to review future overseas nuclear projects as a result
‘No Need for Nuclear: the Renewables are Here’ conference
Did you know that solar panels produced more electricity than Britain’s eight nuclear power stations for the first time May?  And wind & solar together provide for the UK’s entire energy needs on one day in June? As the infrastructure gets more efficient, the UK is better able to take advantage of sunny and windy days.
Government research has consistently shown that renewable are now the most popular of energy amongst the general public, yet the government wrongly claims that they fail to win public support and remains committed to building a new generation of nuclear power plants.

It’s vital that we set the agenda on this topic at the beginning of the new government’s term in office. That’s why we have called a major conference to focus on the crucial question of nuclear power on June 17thin London. Expertswill explore a number of topics including what’s wrong with nuclear powerthe politics of nuclear powerenergy demandenergy efficiencyand the scope of renewables in the UK.

‘No need for nuclear: the renewables are here’ on Saturday 17 June 2017 from 10.15 – 5pm
at Conway Hall, 25 Red Lion Square, London WC1R 4RL
Conference web site: cnduk.org/NoNeedForNuclear

Summer 2017

Nuclear Industry – post Brexit crisis looms
Britain’s nuclear industry has issued its strongest warning yet on the problems it faces if the government is unable to strike new international atomic power deals during Brexit talks. Failure to put in place alternative arrangements to replace the existing European nuclear treaty, Euratum, which the UK is quitting as part of the Brexit process, would have a ‘dramatic impact’ on Hinkley Point & other new power stations, on existing operations and the waste & decommissioning sectors which all depend on cooperation with other nuclear states.

Our reputation for co-operation is, however, not good. On the 20th March this year a UN committee asked the Government to suspend all work on Hinkley Point because of their failure to consult with other European countries about the transboundary environmental impacts of the project. The body said the government should wait until it has heard back from countries including Germany, Norway and the Netherlands. Hinkley is just one of a fleet of new nuclear power stations that the government hopes will be built over the next 15 years.
But a cloud has been cast over one of the biggest projects, at Moorside in Cumbria, because one of its key backers, Toshiba, has suffered financial problems and promised to review future overseas nuclear projects as a result.

‘No Need for Nuclear: the Renewables are Here’ conference
Did you know that solar panels produced more electricity than Britain’s eight nuclear power stations for the first time May?  And wind & solar together provide for the UK’s entire energy needs on one day in June? As the infrastructure gets more efficient, the UK is better able to take advantage of sunny and windy days.
Government research has consistently shown that renewable are now the most popular of energy amongst the general public, yet the government wrongly claims that they fail to win public support and remains committed to building a new generation of nuclear power plants.

It’s vital that we set the agenda on this topic at the beginning of the new government’s term in office. That’s why we have called a major conference to focus on the crucial question of nuclear power on June 17th in London. Expertswill explore a number of topics including what’s wrong with nuclear power; the politics of nuclear power; energy demand, energy efficiency; and the scope of renewables in the UK.

‘No need for nuclear: the renewables are here’ on Saturday 17 June 2017 from 10.15 – 5pm
at Conway Hall, 25 Red Lion Square, London WC1R 4RL
Conference web site: cnduk.org/NoNeedForNuclear