News Update

2018 is a very special year for our movement as we celebrate our 60th anniversary. Nationally CND is arranging an extensive programme of events to celebrate and commemorate six decades of campaigning, activism and our never faltering dedication! All the local CND groups in the East Midlands are putting on special events to mark the anniversary and more information about national events to be found at: CND National Site – CND@60.

In Leicester there will be ‘The Art of Protest Exhibition’ from 27 February – 13 March in the Basement Gallery of the Adult Education Centre, 54 Belvoir Street, showing the work of local campaigners for peace. There will be a Peace Festival in Derby from the 23 to the 28 April 2018 & CND 60th Anniversary Installation will be at Chesterfield Parish Church ‘The Crooked Spire’ on Thursday 13 September. Nottingham also plans special events during 2018

In Leicester there will be ‘The Art of Protest Exhibition’ from 27 February – 13 March in the Basement Gallery of the Adult Education Centre, 54 Belvoir Street, showing the work of local campaigners for peace. There will be a Peace Festival in Derby from the 23 to the 28 April 2018 & CND 60th Anniversary Installation will be at Chesterfield Parish Church ‘The Crooked Spire’ on Thursday 13 September. Nottingham also plans special events during 2018.

 On Easter Sunday, 1st April, we will be heading to Aldermaston with the CND symbol as part of the tour to commemorate 60 years since the first march to Aldermaston. It will provide a backdrop for CCND’s Easter vigil at 12 noon, and there will be an opportunity for photos, memories and looking ahead. Do come along to all these events if you can! They will provide inspiration to work even harder to achieve our aim of Global Nuclear Disarmament.

In December ICAN – the global peace network – of which CND Is a partner organisation, received the NOBEL PEACE PRIZE for its work on the new “Nuclear Weapons Ban Treaty” which was agreed at the United Nations last year. After 72 years, there has been a breakthrough. 122 countries attending the United Nations in New York have signed the Treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons. The UK government refused to take part. So did the other nuclear-armed states, even though they have continued to call for multilateral nuclear disarmament!’
The US-North Korean nuclear brinkmanship is an enormous challenge to this fantastic work. So too is President Trump’s determination to unpick the Iran nuclear weapons deal, a deal that has been widely recognised as successful. That’s why we warmly welcome the decision of the Nobel committee to support those who are struggling for more co-operation and less confrontation, defying the sordid logic of our present world leaders who appear to be hell bent on war.

THE GLOBAL NUCLEAR WEAPONS BAN TREATY
The UN has adopted a ground breaking treaty which comprehensively prohibits nuclear weapons and opens the door to their total elimination.  The treaty’s list of prohibitions includes their use, stockpiling, testing, production, manufacture, stationing and installation. It also bans assisting with the prohibited acts, such as US leasing of Trident missiles to the UK, to carry nuclear warheads. It will also be illegal to allow nuclear weapons to travel through territorial waters or airspace.
The extent of the hostility to the ban treaty from the nuclear weapons states must not be underestimated, nor the pressure they  will exert on other countries to withhold support.  Right at the start of the negotiations the UK chose not to engage with the 132 nations inside the chamber but stood alongside Trump’s representative and denounced the talks, despite our governments’ repeated commitment to a multilateral disarmament process.

CITIZENS’ TREATY ON THE PROHIBITION OF NUCLEAR WEAPONS
Nuclear weapons are weapons of mass destruction, which are illegal, immoral and a waste of money. CND is calling on people to sign up to a people’s initiative: “We are deeply concerned about the catastrophic humanitarian consequences that would result from any use of nuclear weapons… we welcome the UN Treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons…We note that the British government has refused to sign this treaty and in this absence of proper leadership on this vital question, we believe that it falls to the citizens of this country themselves to support the global nuclear ban treaty”. Copies of this petition will be available on all our stalls and at events or go to www.cnduk.org

REDEFINING SECURITY – FROM DETERRENCE TO COMMON SECURITY
A decade and a half of ceaseless wars – Afghanistan, Iraq, Libya, Syria, Ukraine, Yemen – have brought the world to the utmost point of danger where nuclear armed states are hurtling towards confrontation, not least in the case of Korea. People everywhere are crying out for a new approach to international peace. The crises of our times demand a paradigm shift in thinking about security, countering ‘deterrence’ with a common security approach.
The notion of ‘deterrence’ is based on fear, suspicion and an obsession with the threat from ‘potential adversaries’ Today, mutually assured destruction has transmuted into a search for predominance beyond challenge, an absolute security through Full Spectrum Dominance. Nuclear weapons it is claimed are a necessary ‘insurance’ against an ‘aggressive Russia’ or a ’mad North Korea’.  But security cannot be achieved by making others insecure. Nations hold security in common & the common security approach commits states to joint survival rather than a threat of mutual destruction and annihilation Next year, the 11th of the 11th 2018, marks the centenary of The Declaration of World Peace. Among the many significant anniversaries next year this is one we should try to mark by making it the date when our Government agrees to join the rest of the world by signing up to the Global Nuclear Weapons Ban Treaty.

CAMPAIGNING FOR PEACE
President Trump wants to sabotage the Iran nuclear deal, opening the door to nuclear proliferation and military conflict. This is a tragic misuse of power. The world faces enormous existential global challenges, like climate change negotiation. It removed the prospect of war and nuclear weapons development and replaced it with cooperation and the possibility of real constructive engagement. Rather than seeing this as a model for future engagement, as a way forward for solving complex problems like that of the Korean peninsula, Trump is on the path to war.: this is the time for states to work together, to cooperate, not to take unilateral, confrontational actions that risk reducing our planet to a radioactive wasteland.
The Iranian nuclear deal was a remarkable achievement which shows just what can be achieved through painstaking diplomacy. Protest & Survive!